Why Fire Doors ?

I remember the doors between classrooms and corridors in my High School, they were very plain in appearance, though painted in various colours to signify sections of the school and if glazed they had panels of wired glass. At the time I just thought they were utilitarian, boring and probably cheap, what I didn’t realise until later was that these uninteresting doors performed a very important function. They were Fire Doors, that very importantly prevent fire from spreading between areas within a building.

Intumescent seal

The intumescent seal around the glazing of a custom fire door

Nowadays, fire doors are used in many situations, not just in public buildings but in many domestic properties. If a house is built over 2 floors, is used as a multiple occupancy or has a loft conversion, then building inspectors require these rooms to have FD30 doors that must resist fire for at least 30 minutes. If a house has an integral garage leading into the property then a fire door is required and depending on the situation sometimes an FD60 (60minutes protection) door is required. These doors should also have an appropriate frame, smoke seals (or intumescent seals) and hardware to provide the same fire protection as the door.

Now this all sounds like it may compromise the appearance and style of the property. This is not the case anymore as a very large amount of timber door designs also have corresponding, certified fire doors.

Kershaws Doors Ltd sell a vast amount of timber Fire Doors with the legal requirement for FD certified doors. In addition they also supply suitable frames, seals and hardware to resist fire. These doors have been tested by demonstrating fire resistance performance to the required time period (e.g. 30 or 60 minutes). There are 5 pages of fire doors on the site including Custom Made fire doors which offer flexibility for non-standard sizes. The drop down menu on each page helps you to choose the size and denotes whether it is a standard or Fire Door.

At present Kershaws Doors have a special promotion on FD30 Fire Certified white doors. They are the Canterbury 4 Panel fire door and the Colonist 6 Panel both classic door designs with pressed, raised and fielded style panels. The very low price of £64.08 each for either style makes these doors an ideal choice for refurbishments, where cost efficiency is paramount. These doors are factory primed, ready for a top coat finish (see our finishing guidelines on the website).

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2 Responses to Why Fire Doors ?

  1. Gemma Haynes says:

    We have put an offer in on a house that has a loft conversion. The loft conversion didn’t pass building regulations due to a lack of fire doors. The vendors have rectified this and had fire doors installed. However, the door that leads into the loft bedroom is at a slant so the fire door has been cut to shape. We have however read on the internet that you cannot cut a fire door.

    Can a fire door be custom made to a specific shape? If a regulated fire door is not fitted to the entrance to the loft conversion, the room is not classed as habitable and therefore the house loses it’s marketability of a 4 bedroom.

  2. Jonny says:

    Hi Gemma, Fire doors can be manufactured to specific shapes, such as a slanted top, as you’ve mentioned. However these are usually custom made by a specialist manufacturer. If the vendors have taken an existing fire door and adjusted/cut the door to size then it’s most likely not going to meet the regulations. A standard fire door allows about 4mm of trimming on any edge, but anymore than that would be entering the core of the door and voiding it’s fire certificate.

    There is an exception to this rule, some fire rated door blanks will allow for shaping and trimming to any size, providing the door is re-lipped on the edges. If you need to discuss this then give our sales team a call or email us on help@kershawsdoors.co.uk

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